LIVE Wrestling Sessions:  Don’t Just Wrestle…Get Better!

LIVE Wrestling Sessions: Don’t Just Wrestle…Get Better!

Attending live wrestling sessions, open mats, or scrimmages, has to be accompanied with the idea that a wrestler is there in order to improve.  Wrestlers must take steps in order to make these sessions effective to their development in the sport of wrestling.  These live wrestling sessions can be an invaluable asset to ones training, but it must be done with the following rules in mind or it could become a waste of a wrestler’s time.  Have a Plan to Improve – Wrestlers should not ever walk into an open mat “blind”, or without a plan of attack to get better.  If a wrestler comes to a live wrestling session just to “wrestle” then they will not improve.  Every wrestler has weaknesses that they can work to improve upon.  Those should be the start of forming a plan on how to attack an open mat session with success. Make Short Term Goals for Each Session – Competitors thrive on setting goals and trying to achieve them.  An open mat should be no different.  Go into every session setting a few goals to achieve based on your weaknesses.  “I will get an escape or reversal 75% of any goes in which I start down,” could be a bottom goal or “I will score with a single leg (a weakness) 7 times during the session.”  These goals are not about winning and losing but about executing technique and strategy effectively. Try New Things – Number three goes along with the first two rules.  Why keep using the same technique and strategy that you always use during a practice.  Get outside of your...
Wrestling Classes – A (somewhat) New Way of Thinking for the Sport!

Wrestling Classes – A (somewhat) New Way of Thinking for the Sport!

Gymnastics.  Karate.  Tai-Kwon-do.  Boxing.   All of these individual sports operate within a class system, especially as a starting point of learning.  If a child wants to participate in any of these activities, the parent signs them up for a class to learn them.  The classes are made to meet the needs of the level of ability of the child. Why then does wrestling not do this?  Wrestling puts 30-60 wrestlers in a room at the beginning of each wrestling season.   There is a wide range of ability and experience levels.  The high level wrestlers with more experience get bored with learning the same technique and learning the same drills they do each year.  The lower level wrestlers and beginners are lost and need a lot of attention that they do not necessarily get.  A college teammate of mine brought this idea up when his kids started to box recently.  They would go to one class a week and learn the basics of boxing in a small class.   He was the first person to ask that question when it comes to wrestling.  Why does wrestling not follow a system like other individual sports?   This really made me start thinking about how wrestling has been organized and taught for years, and how it could be changed to benefit wrestlers as they grow in the sport.  As I continued to think about this concept, I found many positives to teaching wrestling in a class type system. My kids are both involved in gymnastics (at ages 4 and 6).  I often study what the gym offers children in their classes.  With gymnastics as...